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VIDEO: Last wall at old Ralph comes down

After weeks of demolition the final walls of the old Ralph Englestad Arena at UND came down Wednesday, making way for the next phase -- construction of a $13 million indoor practice facility.

Final walls of the old Ralph Engelstad Arena being demolished
Submitted photo.

After weeks of demolition the final walls of the old Ralph Englestad Arena at UND came down Wednesday, making way for the next phase -- construction of a $13 million indoor practice facility.

The wall fell at around 9:30 Wednesday morning. From the very start of demolition at the end of July all the way up until today, fans showed up to see the structure, built in the early 1970s, slowly come down.

"Every few days we come by, sometimes every day," said Bruce Bohlman, who lives near the arena site.

Long-time UND sports fan Mike Dorsher may be the person that spent the most time watching the demolition.

"Now I come because I like to see the people that are coming to remember this and the things that went on in here," he said.

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The demolition company has even offered a chance for fans to take home a little piece of history from the Ralph.

Fans have purchased almost all 4,000 seats that once graced the inside of the arena. Other memorabilia being sold from the old Ralph are paintings that were in the weight room and bricks from the building.

Project Manager Meredith Berger said the demolition process is on schedule.

Related Topics: HOCKEYRALPH ENGELSTAD ARENA
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