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UND's Seabloom to discuss mammals of N.D. Badlands on Friday

MEDORA, N.D. -- Robert Seabloom, Professor Emeritus at UND, will present "Scratchings and Squeakings: Lesser Known Mammals of the North Dakota Badlands" at 1:45 p.m. MDT Friday in the South Unit Visitor Center auditorium at Theodore Roosevelt Nat...

MEDORA, N.D. -- Robert Seabloom, Professor Emeritus at UND, will present "Scratchings and Squeakings: Lesser Known Mammals of the North Dakota Badlands" at 1:45 p.m. MDT Friday in the South Unit Visitor Center auditorium at Theodore Roosevelt National Park near Medora, N.D.

Seabloom taught mammology, vertebrate natural history and various wildlife courses at UND for 35 years. He is a member of the American Society of Mammologists, The Wildlife Society, Great Plains Natural Science Society and other conservation organizations. His new book, "Mammals of North Dakota," is the first comprehensive work on the mammals of the state since 1926. North Dakota state paleontologist John W. Hoganson and Bill Jensen, a big game biologist with the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, contributed to the book.

"The park is well known for its bison, elk, deer and prairie dogs," said Valerie Naylor, park superintendent. "But what about the mammals we usually don't see? This will be a fun and interesting presentation which will highlight those animals that are not as familiar but are just as important to the Badlands."

The Friday presentation, which Naylor will introduce, is cosponsored by Theodore Roosevelt National Park and the Theodore Roosevelt Nature and History Association. Seabloom will sign copies of "Mammals of North Dakota" after the presentation. The books are offered for sale by TRNHA in the park's visitor centers.

Related Topics: BADLANDSMEDORA
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