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UND student pleads not guilty to assaulting an officer

A UND student who caused a ruckus at a sorority-sponsored event pleaded not guilty to six charges including assaulting a police officer Monday in Grand Forks County Court.

Shawn Coenen

A UND student who caused a ruckus at a sorority-sponsored event pleaded not guilty to six charges including assaulting a police officer Monday in Grand Forks County Court.

Shawn P. Coenen, 19, is charged with four misdemeanors and a pair of Class B felonies after he allegedly lied to law enforcement about being underage, provided a fake ID and fought with officers while being arrested.

A court affidavit said Coenen, who UND police say was highly intoxicated, gave a false name and birth date when questioned by officers and provided an altered ID that said he was 23.

While he was being arrested, he kicked an officer's knee, bending it backwards and tried to break free and run. He was finally contained and put into hobble restraints.

The affidavit said that once arrested, Coenen threatened to kill a nursing student who was along on a ride along with police, drawing an additional terrorizing charge.

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He posted $5,000 bail but can have no contact with the student as a condition of his bail.

Coenen is scheduled to make his next appearance in court on Jan. 5 for a pretrial conference.

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