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UND places second in national flying competition

The UND Flying Team placed second in the National Intercollegiate Flying Association's Safety and Flight Evaluation Conference held earlier this month at Middle Tennessee State University in Smyrna, Tenn.

The UND Flying Team placed second in the National Intercollegiate Flying Association's Safety and Flight Evaluation Conference held earlier this month at Middle Tennessee State University in Smyrna, Tenn.

UND finished with 349 points, behind Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Prescott (Ariz.) with 465. ERAU-Daytona (Fla.) took third with a score of 332.

"We took one of the smallest teams to competition and out-produced many schools that had a great number and more experienced competitors," said head coach and adviser Mark Johnson in a press release. "We have a solid core of returning competitors that will seek to return the national championship to UND."

UND averaged 32 points per competitor, Prescott less than 26 points per competitor, and the others were 20 or less, according to Johnson. The competition consists of 11 events, four flying and seven ground, which test a variety of piloting skills.

Team members who participated were Wes Blanton, Adam Fisel, William Gardner, Aaron Guffey, Ryan Guthridge, Jamie Marshall, Lindsey Meyer, Ryan Perrin, Kyle Schurb, TJ Seemann, Joel Thomas, head coach Johnson and assistant coaches Jim Higgins, Jered Lease and Kyle Sletten.

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