Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

U of M student diagnosed with measles

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn.-- A case of measles has been diagnosed in a 20-year-old University of Minnesota student. Fairview Hospital is contacting staff who may have had contact with the student when he sought treatment in a University of Minnesota faci...

 

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn.-- A case of measles has been diagnosed in a 20-year-old University of Minnesota student.

Fairview Hospital is contacting staff who may have had contact with the student when he sought treatment in a University of Minnesota facility, the Minnesota Department of Health announced in a news release.

The case does not appear to have any connection with a recent measles outbreak in Southern California, according to the health department.

The risk to the general public is very low, said Dr. Ed Ehlinger, the state's health commissioner. But people should take proper precautions to protect themselves and their children against the disease, he said. That includes making sure children are properly immunized against measles.

ADVERTISEMENT

Measles is caused by a virus. Symptoms include rash accompanied by fever and in some cases a cough or a runny nose, according to the health department. Symptoms appear eight to 12 days after the person is exposed and usually begins with a fever. The rash usually appears two to three days after the fever begins and lasts five to six days.

Measles cases have become rare in Minnesota, the health department said.

Related Topics: EDUCATIONHEALTH
What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.