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TV news veteran Dick Wallack dies at age 82

DULUTH -- Dick Wallack, whose long career in broadcast journalism included anchoring stints at television stations in Duluth and Fargo, died Thursday at age 82.

DULUTH -- Dick Wallack, whose long career in broadcast journalism included anchoring stints at television stations in Duluth and Fargo, died Thursday at age 82.

A Korean War veteran, Wallack started his broadcast career at WJON radio in St. Cloud in 1953 and then re-enlisted in the Marines for a few years.

He became a news anchor at KXJB and KXGO-TV in Fargo in 1960, and worked for WDAY-TV and radio before being hired as WDIO-TV's first news anchor when the Duluth station started broadcasting in 1966.

In 1971, Wallack left WDIO to become anchor at then WDSM-TV, now KBJR in Duluth. He transitioned to behind-the-scenes roles as managing editor and producer, and launched KBJR's "Live at Five" show in the early 1980s.

He retired from KBJR in 1994.

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"I learned so much about how journalism works, and how journalism is supposed to work, from Dick Wallack," said Barbara Reyelts, news director at Northland's News Center, which includes KBJR. "He was a pioneer, and just such a great guy."

Born in St. Cloud, Wallack also spent 14 years as a career counselor with the Minnesota Army National Guard. He is survived by his wife, Sharon, and five children.

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