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Three-part Herald video documentary, 'On the border,' captures snapshot of life on the border in northwest Minnesota

The documentary, titled “On the border,” offers deep insight into how communities along the Minnesota-Canadian border are dealing with the coronavirus pandemic and loss of travel and tourism between the U.S. and Canada.

Border flags.PNG
Photo/ Brad Dokken, Grand Forks Herald
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As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, and the U.S.-Canada border remains closed to nonessential travel, the Grand Forks Herald this past fall went to see what’s happening in northwest Minnesota around Lake of the Woods and in border communities such as Lancaster, Roseau and Warroad.

What did we find? It depends on who you ask and where they’re from.

Our multi-part documentary series, “On the border,” launched Friday, Dec. 18.

Here are the three videos in the series: "Business," "Life on the Lake" and "Border Life."
ON THE BORDER: BUSINESS

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ON THE BORDER: LIFE ON THE LAKE

ON THE BORDER: BORDER LIFE

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