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Thief River Falls man sexually abused child for two to three years, charges say

THIEF RIVER FALLS--A Thief River Falls man faces numerous charges and serious prison time after police said he sexually abused a child. A Pennington County District judge set bond Monday for Xavier Tabias Hightower, 28, at $30,000 after he was ch...

Xavier Hightower
Xavier Hightower

THIEF RIVER FALLS-A Thief River Falls man faces numerous charges and serious prison time after police said he sexually abused a child.

A Pennington County District judge set bond Monday for Xavier Tabias Hightower, 28, at $30,000 after he was charged with four felony counts of criminal sexual conduct-three in the first degree and one second-degree charge. The allegations come after a child less than 13 years old told investigators Hightower had sexually abused her multiple times over the last two to three years, according to charging documents.

The child described Hightower sexually assaulting her while she slept, according to court documents. The juvenile would put a basket of clothes against the door to keep it from opening, court documents said.

The alleged acts did not happen every day but were random, the child said in court documents.

Each first-degree charge carries a maximum punishment of 30 years in prison, while the second-degree crime is punishable by up to 25 years in prison.

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