Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

THAT REMINDS ME: Balmy '32 saw rinks sit idle

Long before the theory of global warming, Grand Forks occasionally saw mild weather in December and January. That was the case in 1932, when Grand Forks Park Board crews were thwarted by warm temperatures when they tried to flood the skating rinks.

Long before the theory of global warming, Grand Forks occasionally saw mild weather in December and January. That was the case in 1932, when Grand Forks Park Board crews were thwarted by warm temperatures when they tried to flood the skating rinks.

Max Kannowski, park superintendent, said it would be impossible to put the Riverside toboggan slide in place because of the soft condition of the Red River, onto which the sleds coasted.

However, the annual harvesting of ice started in early January by Grand Forks Ice & Fuel and Dunlevy companies. They had 30 men and several teams of horses at work on the Red and Red Lake rivers and expected to hire more men when ice conditions improved.

The ice was only 14 inches thick when work began, and zero degree weather was expected to bring it to 18 inches. About 18,000 tons of ice would be packed in 50 work days. It would be for consumption in Grand Forks and East Grand Forks. About 15,000 tons would be stored for Western Fruit Express Co. and the Great Northern and Northern Pacific Railroads.

Seventy-five years ago, Grand Forks had a hockey team called the Dragons. They defeated the Alvarado Hornets 13 to 1 with brilliant offense, the Herald reported after the game at Alvarado, N.D. The Dragons' front line consisted of Capt. Noly Franz, Cliff Purpur and Walt Jondahl. The Dragons also swamped the Fargo-Moorhead sextet 10 to 1, outplaying their downstate rivals in every department, according to the Herald.

ADVERTISEMENT

The All-American Turkey Show was probably the biggest event in January 1932. It was held from January 25 to 28, and the newly decorated City Auditorium downtown was filled with double-deck display cages.

Cecile Lathrop from Littleton, Colo., won the Master Breeder award. The Belmont Café here paid a premium price of $1 a pound for one of the champion turkeys. Mrs. D.C. McLeod of Crary, N.D., was elected president of the Turkey Hen Club.

In other news 75 years ago:

-- Work was well under way on the new $2 million state capitol building in Bismarck.

-- "Their Fathers' God" by O.E. Rolvaag was the most popular book in the Grand Forks Library.

-- North Dakota Democrats endorsed Franklin D. Roosevelt to be a candidate in the pre-presidential primaries March 15.

-- A citywide committee was appointed to study unemployment. Several hundred jobless persons were registered at the federal employment office here.

Names in the news in January 1932:

ADVERTISEMENT

-- Outgoing President J.R. Carley called a meeting to elect 11 trustees for the new Grand Forks Country Club, which had 90 members. R.F. Bridgeman was elected president.

-- Mayor T.A. Sullivan of East Grand Forks headed the slate of those taking office following the November election. He planned to re-appoint Harry Gregg as chief of police. It was the fourth term for Sullivan; East Grand Forks' first mayor was T.J. McAdam in 1883.

What To Read Next
Artificial intelligence can now act as an artist or a writer. Does that mean AI is ready to play doctor? Many institutions, including Mayo Clinic, believe that AI is ready to become a useful tool.
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.