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Teacher retirement incentive in Crookston could be revisited

The issue of teacher retirement incentives for 21 Crookston teachers may be revisited at a combined meeting of the School Board's personnel and finance committees at 7 a.m. today in the district office conference room in Crookston.

The issue of teacher retirement incentives for 21 Crookston teachers may be revisited at a combined meeting of the School Board's personnel and finance committees at 7 a.m. today in the district office conference room in Crookston.

Crookston School District Superintendent Wayne Gilman said Monday that no formal action will be taken today on the incentive plan, but recommendations may be made for the full board to discuss at its meeting next Monday.

The board has been deadlocked over the issue of a $10,000 incentive to be placed in the teacher's health savings account. Twenty-one teachers are eligible because they're at least 55 and have taught in the district for 15 years.

But four teachers -- Leslie Wagner, Joe Henry, Dawn Newton and Kathie Barnes -- submitted their retirement letters earlier this spring and are not being offered the incentive. That drew votes against the issue from school board members Bob Altringer, Keith Bakken and Nick Nicholas.

Gilman told the Herald that paying the four teachers who already have retired wouldn't save the district money.

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The full board will meet at 5 p.m. Monday in the choir room at Crookston High School.

Related Topics: EDUCATION
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