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Student wins Xcel Energy contest

For the fourth time, Grand Forks fifth-grader Jonathan Penman's artwork was selected to be part of Xcel Energy's annual Safety Calendar. More than 25,000 of the calendars will be distributed this summer to teachers across the nation. Xcel Energy ...

For the fourth time, Grand Forks fifth-grader Jonathan Penman's artwork was selected to be part of Xcel Energy's annual Safety Calendar.

More than 25,000 of the calendars will be distributed this summer to teachers across the nation. Xcel Energy chose Penman's drawing, along with the artwork of 12 other kindergarten through sixth-grade students. The company received more than 1,000 contest entries from eight states this year.

Penman, who is home-schooled, drew the only one chosen from North Dakota, according to Xcel spokeswoman Bonnie Lund. Penman was honored Monday by Xcel officials at a ceremony in the Golden Corral Restaurant in Grand Forks.

His talent runs in the family, Lund said. Penman's two sisters have each had their artwork selected for the calendar twice.

"We're pretty familiar with this family by now," said Lund.

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Penman's artwork will depict the month of December. It features a holiday theme with the safety message, "Inspect cords carefully . . . Replace broken wires!"

Penman received a framed poster of his artwork and a $100 savings bond.

Herald staff report

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