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Storstad comes up big

BISMARCK -- Megan Storstad kept things simple. She had only one goal before this season: She wanted to reach the state Class A girls track meet. Once she got to state, she said, "I just wanted to try my best." She was simply the best Saturday. Th...

BISMARCK -- Megan Storstad kept things simple.

She had only one goal before this season: She wanted to reach the state Class A girls track meet.

Once she got to state, she said, "I just wanted to try my best."

She was simply the best Saturday. The Grand Forks Red River junior won the state javelin title with a toss of 121 feet, 5 inches on a chilly, rainy Saturday at the Bismarck Community Bowl.

In only her second year of throwing the javelin, Storstad moved up from her second seed entering the meet to the top of the podium.

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Her big throw came on her second attempt of preliminaries. She then had to wait to see if Bismarck High's Kaitlyn Sturlaugson, who entered with the state's best throw, could top the mark.

Sturlaugson didn't, finishing with a best toss of 119-11.

Storstad said coaching and hard work pulled her through.

"I feel like I've been working pretty hard every day," Storstad said.

Storstad's toss was her second best of the season. Her personal record is 123-11, which topped her best from last year by more than 25 feet.

"She really made a lot of improvement," said Tim Tandeski, who coaches Grand Forks javelin throwers. "She's a great kid and a great competitor. She's just solid at everything. She has pretty good foot speed, good strength, good coordination, and she's a good all-around athlete.

"Those are the type of people you want throwing the javelin."

Storstad exceeded preseason expectations, Tandeski said.

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"I thought if things went well she would probably be a state placer," he said. "But things went very well and she ended up a state champion.

Fee paces Central

Rebecca Fee entered the meet with the second-best time in the 400 meters. And she placed second in the event with a time of 57.47 seconds.

The Grand Forks Central freshman entered with the eighth-best time in the 800. She moved up to fourth with a personal-best time of 2:20.48.

Fargo South phenom Laura Roesler won both events, running the 400 in :55.76 and the 800 in 2:10.78. Roesler won the 100, 200, 400 and 800 to lead South to a third-place finish. Bismarck High won with 138 points, followed by Bismarck Century with 126.

Roesler, a sophomore, now has 13 individual titles.

Central coach Eric Polries said he was pleased with Fee's state meet.

"I think it was well deserved for her to have those times," Polries said. "She hasn't run those races a lot on the same day, but she handled them well. She got aggressive. In the 400, she pushed on the backstretch with Laura. I think that helped finish it out, knowing she could stick up there.

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"Confidence from that 400 carried on for her 800, and she had a nice race there, too."

Greening places

fourth in high jump

Devils Lake junior Alicia Greening placed fourth in the high jump with a leap of 5-1. South's Greta Zietz won with a jump of 5-4.

Greening and Bismarck High's Twila Moser had the top qualifying jumps of 5-4.

"She looked like she had good pop today," Devils Lake coach Jim Samson said. "It doesn't work out all the time for us. It was a good field."

Samson said he may bring Greening to Bismarck during the regular season next year.

"It's a different surface for us, a different facility," he said. "I'm not sure that next year we need to get down here and jump in this facility at least once."

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