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Statement from Kupchella and Weisenstein

Statement from UND President Dr. Charles Kupchella and UND Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Greg Weisenstein This afternoon, staff at the University of North Dakota School of Law discovered an 8-by-10-inch figure of a swastika ...

Statement from UND President Dr. Charles Kupchella and UND Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Greg Weisenstein

This afternoon, staff at the University of North Dakota School of Law discovered an 8-by-10-inch figure of a swastika on the outside of a window near one of the Law School entrances. The figure was not highly visible because of a piece of paper on the inside of the window and because the image appeared to be drawn in a clear substance. After University Police documented the figure, it was removed. It is unknown who drew the image, or how long it was there before being discovered. University Police are investigating the matter.

The swastika has come to be a symbol of hate, conveying a message of intimidation, violence and intolerance. We are saddened, disappointed and disgusted that swastikas have appeared on our campus. These acts are NOT tolerated at UND. There is no place the University of North Dakota -- or anywhere else, for that matter -- for harassing, demeaning or culturally insensitive acts. We will continue to investigate these activities and when perpetrators are identified, we will seek prosecution through our Code of Student life and, where warranted, through the court systems.

We will continue to do all that we can to sustain a welcoming and safe learning and working environment for everyone at the University of North Dakota.

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