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Starbucks plans to better blend with communities, reduce environmental impact

Coffee Goliath Starbucks plans to better integrate its new company-operated stores into the surrounding community and make them more environmentally friendly.

Starbucks
Many of the materials used in the 1st Avenue & Pike Street Starbucks store in Seattle are warm and rustic, reflecting the look and feel of a workmen's commissary. The columns, floor and ceiling were preserved from existing buildings; the wood in the cabinets was repurposed from fallen trees in the Seattle area; and the community table came from a local restaurant. Starbucks plans to better integrate its new company-operated stores into the surrounding community, like the one in Seattle, and also make the...

Coffee Goliath Starbucks plans to better integrate its new company-operated stores into the surrounding community and make them more environmentally friendly.

The company announced in late June that the designs of its new stores "will reflect the character of each store's surrounding neighborhood and help to reduce environmental impacts." The stores will use local materials and craftsmen and focus on the "elevation of coffee and removal of unnecessary distractions."

At the same time, the company will pursue several environmental goals.

By 2010, Starbucks aims to achieve LEED certification for all new stores, use 50 percent renewable energy in its stores and make its stores 25 percent more energy efficient.

By 2015, the company plans to use only recyclable or reusable cups and to make recycling more widely available in its stores.

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The new designs and environmental goals will be implemented in company-operated stores. As a chain, the majority of its U.S. stores are company-operated.

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