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Spotlight on North Dakota history: 1930s: An eventful period in North Dakota's history

In 1932, North Dakota dedicated its new Capitol building. A second dedication was held the following year after allegations that the first cornerstone had been damaged.

In 1932, North Dakota dedicated its new Capitol building. A second dedication was held the following year after allegations that the first cornerstone had been damaged.

  • Prohibition agents hit a still at Jamestown making it the biggest raid west of Chicago; the still was capable of producing 1,000 gallons of moonshine a day. The prohibition clause of the state Constitution was repealed by the electorate and former Attorney General William Lemke was elected to congress.
  • The Farmers Holiday Association was formed at Jamestown; farmers blockaded marketing points in northwestern North Dakota in an effort to raise commodity prices.

1933:

  • Governor William L. Langer proclaimed moratoriums on mortgage foreclosure sales and on the shipment of farm commodities from North Dakota; the latter was declared unconstitutional in 1934 by a Federal judge. A Farm Holiday Association strike in May proved unsuccessful and a violent strike at the new Capitol construction site forced a call-up of the North Dakota National Guard.

1934:

  • On July 18, the North Dakota Supreme Court disqualified Governor Langer as a result of his conviction for campaigning law violations and Lt. Governor Ole Olson assumed office.

Source: State Historical Society of North Dakota.

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