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Sjodin search resumes

Dru Sjodin's father and a few others will search again this week for the 22-year-old UND student in areas of Polk County. Allan Sjodin, of Minneapolis, will be joined by Bob Heales, the Denver private investigator and Chris Lang, Dru's boyfriend,...

Dru Sjodin's father and a few others will search again this week for the 22-year-old UND student in areas of Polk County.

Allan Sjodin, of Minneapolis, will be joined by Bob Heales, the Denver private investigator and Chris Lang, Dru's boyfriend, Heales told the Herald on Tuesday.

Denny Adams, Conde, S.D., will bring bloodhounds again to check out "water areas," Heales said. The handful of searchers will begin today and spend the rest of the week searching.

Authorities say Sjodin was kidnapped Nov. 22 from a Grand Forks shopping mall parking lot by Alfonso Rodriguez Jr. of Crookston.

A convicted sex offender, Rodriguez, 50, remains in the Grand Forks jail under $5 million bond. He is scheduled to be tried next month on the kidnapping charge. He has denied any involvement in Sjodin's disappearance.

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DNA evidence

Investigators say blood matching Sjodin's DNA was found in Rodriguez's car.

But Rodriguez's attorney, David Dusek, recently won approval from District Judge Lawrence Jahnke to hire a critic of DNA evidence to testify.

William Shields, a professor of environmental and forest biology at State University of New York, testified last fall for the defense in the famous Laci Peterson murder case in Modesto, Calif. He said that problems in FBI methods of DNA testing cast doubt on whether a single strand of hair actually belonged to Laci Peterson.

Shields was hired by Mark Geragos, the attorney for Scott Peterson, who is charged with killing his wife, Laci, and their unborn son.

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