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Sioux defense dominates in first scrimmage

UND's spring football season hit a higher gear Saturday at Memorial Stadium. The Sioux scrimmaged for the first time, and the results were predictable. The defense, long regarded as UND's strength, made most of the big plays. "The defense had the...

UND's spring football season hit a higher gear Saturday at Memorial Stadium.

The Sioux scrimmaged for the first time, and the results were predictable. The defense, long regarded as UND's strength, made most of the big plays.

"The defense had the upper hand," UND coach Dale Lennon said. "The positive in that is the defense was a concern going into spring ball. There were some pretty good hits out there."

But the defense's performance wasn't a surprise. Most of the time in spring ball, defenses usually have the advantage.

Also, a handful of players missed the scrimmage due to minor injuries.

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Three others offensive linemen Erik Moe and Creighton Schroyer and cornerback Donovan Alexander missed the scrimmage because they competed for UND at a track and field meet in Moorhead.

The absence of Moe and Schroyer left the Sioux with only eight offensive linemen for the scrimmage.

All four UND quarterbacks played. Danny Freund ran the first offense, while his backups were Ryan Konrath, Jake Landry and Brock Setness.

"We put the ball on the turf a few times and there were some picks," Lennon said of the Sioux offense. "That's something we need to eliminate."

The Sioux wrap up their spring football season this week. The team's annual spring game is set for Saturday at Memorial Stadium. The scrimmage begins at noon.

"Overall, we would have liked to have seen more," Lennon said. "But at least now we know where we're at.

"We have a lot of work to do, but that's normal."

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