Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Sheriff's office: Father on GFAFB shook baby

Authorities say a man living on the Grand Forks Air Force Base has admitted to shaking his infant son. Kyle Danaher, 20, is set to appear Tuesday in state District Court in Grand Forks on charges of child abuse and neglect. Danaher's son was take...

Authorities say a man living on the Grand Forks Air Force Base has admitted to shaking his infant son.

Kyle Danaher, 20, is set to appear Tuesday in state District Court in Grand Forks on charges of child abuse and neglect.

Danaher's son was taken to Altru Hospital on Dec. 30 for nausea, vomiting and "increased head size," a sheriff's office report said.

Doctors diagnosed the boy, who was two to three months old at the time, with bleeding on his brain, retinal hemorrhages and a healed rib fracture, the report stated.

A sheriff's office investigator and a county child protection worker spoke with the boy's mother, who is a member of the Air Force, about his injuries. After the interview, the mother told Danaher, who is not an airman, they should talk with a lawyer before discussing the matter further with authorities, the report said.

ADVERTISEMENT

In February, Danaher told investigators he was standing and holding his son with both hands when he shook his son for no longer than five seconds in the living room of his home on the base, the report said. The incident occurred in November or December, a criminal complaint stated.

Danaher, who's charged with a Class B felony of child abuse and a Class C felony of child neglect, faces a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison.

Court officials did not know if Danaher, who is no longer in custody, has an attorney. His phone number is not listed and other attempts to reach him Thursday were not successful.

What To Read Next
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.
2022 saw more than three times as many pediatric (up to age 5) cannabis edible exposures in Minnesota compared to 2021. Here's what you can do to prevent your toddler from getting into the gummies.