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Sheriff's department's new app lets residents submit anonymous tips

The Grand Forks County Sheriff's Department is expanding its "crime-fighting arsenal" with a mobile phone app that lets people send anonymous tips, according to a press release.

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The Grand Forks County Sheriff's Department is expanding its "crime-fighting arsenal" with a mobile phone app that lets people send anonymous tips, according to a press release.

The "GFSO tip411 mobile app" can be downloaded for free on Google Play Store, iTunes App Store or by visiting the Sheriff's Office website.

The app removes all identifying information before law enforcement sees the tips. "There is no way to identify the sender," according to the release.

"In our effort to provide the highest quality service to the community, we wish to keep the public informed and involved," Sheriff Bob Rost said. "We believe the addition of this new app from tip411 will allow us to do just that while forming a deeper crime-fighting partnership with residents."

Those without a smartphone can still submit tips through the department's website or by texting them to 847411.

Related Topics: GRAND FORKS COUNTY
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