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Sheriff recommends burn ban in Grand Forks County

A burn ban should be in place as spring arrives and the area gets dry, Grand Forks County Sheriff Bob Rost said Thursday. "Rural fire departments have responded to a few calls where the dry conditions have caused fires to get out of control in a ...

A burn ban should be in place as spring arrives and the area gets dry, Grand Forks County Sheriff Bob Rost said Thursday.

"Rural fire departments have responded to a few calls where the dry conditions have caused fires to get out of control in a hurry," Rost said in a press release.

Fire departments from the North Dakota towns of Reynolds, Hatton, Northwood and Thompson responded to a mile-long brushfire Tuesday night near Thompson.

Rost will propose a burn ban to the Grand Forks County commissioners at their April 5 meeting, to be effective that day.

"These dry conditions are very serious, and it is the responsibility of county officials to protect the lives and property of the citizens of Grand Forks County," Rost said.

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Anyone who violates the burn ban could be charged with a Class B misdemeanor, spend up to 30 days in jail and pay a $1,500 fine per incident. A violator could also have to pay the cost to put the fire out.

The ban does not apply to the city of Grand Forks. Fire Chief Peter O'Neill would make that decision.

The ban could lifted later "if at some point we get enough moisture," Rost said.

Related Topics: FIRESGRAND FORKS COUNTY
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