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September saw fairly normal weather

The Grand Forks area was colder and rainier in September than normal, National Weather Service reports show. The 56.2 degree average was almost 2 degrees below the normal. NWS Meteorologist Pete Speicher said the area is about 5 degrees colder th...

The Grand Forks area was colder and rainier in September than normal, National Weather Service reports show.

The 56.2 degree average was almost 2 degrees below the normal. NWS Meteorologist Pete Speicher said the area is about 5 degrees colder than last year, but noted that last September was abnormally warm.

Speicher said it's been cloudier here, and while some regions of the country may have been impacted from the hurricanes, Grand Forks is so far from the coasts there was nothing out of the ordinary.

Speicher said the month started out warmer and saw the coldest temperatures during the past week, which dropped the month overall into below average. There was a record-breaking high temperature Sept. 16, when the 92 degree heat tied a previous record from 1979.

There was 2.7 inches of rainfall, which is .65 inches above the average. Speicher said most of the rain came from two big storms, but there wasn't significant damage from either.

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Speicher said September's weather was mostly ordinary and didn't have a significant impact on harvest season.

"I'm seeing a lot of beet trucks out there right now, so it doesn't seem like we have anyone getting stuck or having too much trouble," he said.

Related Topics: WEATHER
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