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Sentence for man who killed mother in Black Hills upheld

PIERRE, S.D.- South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley has announced that Matthew C. Tornquist, 30, Hot Springs, has had his conviction and life sentence with no opportunity for parole for killing his mother affirmed by the South Dakota Suprem...

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PIERRE, S.D.-   South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley has announced that Matthew C. Tornquist, 30, Hot Springs, has had his conviction and life sentence with no opportunity for parole for killing his mother affirmed by the South Dakota Supreme Court.

Her body has still not been found.

On July 14, 2014, Tornquist was found guilty of murder, which carried a mandatory life sentence, and grand theft.

“Matthew Tornquist murdered his mother Catherine while she slept,” said Jackley. “Local, state and federal law enforcement worked tirelessly to solve this missing person homicide, and we will continue to pursue any leads in the hope of locating Catherine to bring further closure for her family. I want to again thank the men and women serving on the jury as murder cases are never easy but an essential part in preserving our system of justice.”

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Tornquist  killed his mother on Oct. 4, 2011, at her home in Fall River County in the Black Hills. He then removed the body. There were more than 50 searches, including some involving area residents, looking for her body after she was reported missing.

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