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Sen. Norm Coleman discusses rural health care in Crookston

U.S. Senator Norm Colemn, R-Minn., visited Crookston on Friday, as part of a four-city tour to discuss his new legislative plans for supporting rural health care in Minnesota.

U.S. Senator Norm Colemn, R-Minn., visited Crookston on Friday, as part of a four-city tour to discuss his new legislative plans for supporting rural health care in Minnesota.

But Coleman didn't just get to promote rural health care Friday - he was able to experience it.

Coleman said he woke up Friday with food poisoning, and during his stop at the Pipestone (Minn.) County Medical Center, he spent about an hour hooked to an IV to alleviate dehydration.

"I can personally testify to the quality of rural health care in Minnesota," Coleman said during a press conference at Crookston's RiverView Health Center.

RiverView is defined as a critical access hospital because it provides 24-hour emergency care services to rural areas.

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Coleman presented seven bills to the U.S. Senate on Thursday, each dealing with health care issues prevalent in Minnesota, that he says could be used nationwide.

"These things are what I have heard that you need," Coleman said. "These aren't just my ideas, or my staff's ideas, but they were born from working closely with the Minnesota Hospital Association to give you what you need in health care."

Crookston was his last stop. After explaining his proposals, Coleman left time for a question-and-answer period with hospital staff and residents.

"These bills are small steps forward in improving health care," Coleman said. "But I believe we are up to the challenge."

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