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Salvation Army begins gathering school supplies

School's out for summer, children are playing and families are on vacation. But The Salvation Army is getting ready to assist low- to moderate-income families with school supplies this fall.

School's out for summer, children are playing and families are on vacation. But The Salvation Army is getting ready to assist low- to moderate-income families with school supplies this fall.

This year's promotion is "Buy 2-Give 1." The idea is to buy a second set of school supplies to give to a needy child. Items include crayons, colored pencils, washable marker, glue sticks, pens, scissors, folders, highlighters, wide- and college-ruled notebooks, binders, pencils, sharpeners, calculators, erasers, supply boxes, index cards, watercolor paints, backpacks, hand sanitizers and Kleenex.

Recycle your "gently" used backpacks.

You may drop off your donations at The Salvation Army, 1600 University Ave., Grand Forks. Cash donations will be used to buy supplies. Donations are requested by Aug. 10.

The Salvation Army will distribute the items to needy children in Grand Forks County and the city of East Grand Forks from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Aug. 14 and 15 at 1600 University Ave., Grand Forks. Please have the following for verification: proof of address, picture identification and verification of children or children living in the home.

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Last year, The Salvation Army assisted 581 students. In a press release, Corps Administrator Major Ed Wilson said rising food and gas prices likely will increase the number needing assistance this year.

For more information, call (701) 775-2597.

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