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Safety improvements planned this month at fatal intersection south of Moorhead

MOORHEAD - An intersection south of here slated for new safety measures will become a four-way stop this month, according to the Minnesota Department of Transportation.

MOORHEAD - An intersection south of here slated for new safety measures will become a four-way stop this month, according to the Minnesota Department of Transportation.

Last month, a 21-year-old woman was killed at the intersection.

In a news release issued Tuesday, MnDOT said motorists on U.S. Highway 75 south of Moorhead will soon be required to stop at the Clay County Road 12 intersection.

Crews will convert the intersection to a four-way stop the week of Jan. 25, weather permitting. The intersection will require northbound and southbound Highway 75 traffic to stop.

Eastbound and westbound traffic on Clay County Road 12 already is required to stop.

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Motorists may encounter crews at the intersection beginning next week as workers prepare and install the four-way stop.

MnDOT said two stop signs and two stop ahead signs will be enhanced with solar-powered LED lights around the edges and crews will grind rumble strips into the pavement alerting motorists as they approach the intersection.

Temporary changeable message signs will also be placed on Highway 75 ahead of the intersection in both directions for added safety until motorists are accustomed to the change.

The four-way stop is an interim measure and will provide additional safety at the intersection until 2011 when a roundabout will be constructed.

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