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Roseville, Minn., officer recounts dog's stabbing: 'You could tell he was hurting'

ST. PAUL Police officer John Jorgensen remembers hearing the loud yelps -- three to four of them -- as his K-9 partner Major was tracking a break-in suspect in Maplewood. He couldn't see the dog, but Jorgensen knew he was hurt. "I called him back...

ST. PAUL

Police officer John Jorgensen remembers hearing the loud yelps -- three to four of them -- as his K-9 partner Major was tracking a break-in suspect in Maplewood.

He couldn't see the dog, but Jorgensen knew he was hurt.

"I called him back to me maybe 20, 30 times over the next couple minutes, and he didn't come back to me, which made me think that it was a worse-case scenario," the Roseville officer said.

Jorgensen spoke about the vicious Nov. 12 attack on his 9-year-old German shepherd for the first time Wednesday at the University of Minnesota's Veterinary Medical Center.

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The dog has been in treatment since the attack at a Maplewood truck utility business. He could be at the center for months to come as he slowly regains the use of his hind legs.

Jorgensen and other officers on the scene went searching for Major in the predawn blackness, crisscrossing a stand of sumac with their flashlights.

"As we searched the lot, I saw his eyes glimmer in the flashlight," Jorgensen said. "I could see he was trying to crawl toward me."

The dog was bloodied from four stab wounds, and his hind legs were useless.

"You could tell he was hurting, but you could also see that dog smile," Jorgensen said.

The officer gives credit for Major's continuing recovery to the staff at the U's animal hospital in St. Paul.

"They saved Major's life, no doubt about that," he said.

Rehabilitation will continue at the hospital until Major is well enough

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to go home with Jorgensen and receive outpatient care, hospital staff said.

In the meantime, letters from well-wishers continue to pour into the Roseville Police Department from around the world -- including Europe, Australia and Canada. More than $5,300 has been donated as well.

Jorgensen said he would continue to be an active part of Major's recovery.

"He wouldn't leave my side, so I've tried to be here as much as I could," he said.

To see daily updates on Major, go to cityofroseville.com/majorupdate.

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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