Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

RODEO: Riders take bulls by the horns

The number of cowboy hats was less than expected at the Alerus Center in Grand Forks on Friday night for the National Professional Rodeo Association Bull Riding Challenge.

The number of cowboy hats was less than expected at the Alerus Center in Grand Forks on Friday night for the National Professional Rodeo Association Bull Riding Challenge.

Most fans sported baseball caps instead.

Still, the sport seems to be growing, according to Julie Ward, director of sales and marketing in the Alerus Center.

"We have noticed attendance and ticket sales going up," she said. "Last year was one of the best shows."

Last year was the first year Alerus Center officials scheduled the event in January rather than in the summer.

ADVERTISEMENT

"There are too many other things going on in the summer," Ward said. "This time of year, we don't have to compete with anything else."

Ward also attributes the high attendance to low ticket prices and keeping the show to just bull riding and nothing else. General admission tickets are $15 for adults and $7.50 for children.

"Since I've been in Grand Forks, I've been to three bull riding competitions," Brad McClard said. "I had never been to one before I moved here."

Fun atmosphere

A small boy was walking around in his cowboy hat and boots Friday night, tipping his hat to every lady he passed, drawing smiles from everyone around him.

"It's surprising how many people are showing up," Ward said. "They really have an exciting time."

Those sitting in what's called the Gold Circle, right next to the gates, have the best seats, according to Ward.

"Those bulls come right up to the gate," she said. "You're basically right over the dirt. When those bulls come out, they're running right at you."

ADVERTISEMENT

Ward thinks the excitement of the environment contributes to the increase in attendance.

"This isn't even typical rodeo country, but it's going to keep growing," she said.

"We come just about every year," said Nancy Beneda of Grand Forks. "They're a lot of fun."

Beneda said she has been to rodeos elsewhere, also, but mostly just in the area.

Jason Haskell, of Grand Forks, decked out in a cowboy hat and boots, agrees that the sport is going to continue to develop saying, "Hell yeah!"

"You don't see all the hillbillies anywhere else," Haskell said. "There are more people and less teeth (in this sport) than any other sport."

There were 40 riders slated to compete Friday, but one local rider could not. C.J. Neumiller of Grand Forks was not able to ride because his father suffered a heart attack.

What To Read Next
Artificial intelligence can now act as an artist or a writer. Does that mean AI is ready to play doctor? Many institutions, including Mayo Clinic, believe that AI is ready to become a useful tool.
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.