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Rock-a-bye baby

April Lindquist gave birth Jan. 1 to a happy and healthy, 7 pound, 6 ounce baby boy, Dylan Ryan Morrow. Besides being named Grand Forks' first baby of 2007, Dylan and his mom received another special honor. Lindquist was chosen by her resident do...

April Lindquist gave birth Jan. 1 to a happy and healthy, 7 pound, 6 ounce baby boy, Dylan Ryan Morrow.

Besides being named Grand Forks' first baby of 2007, Dylan and his mom received another special honor. Lindquist was chosen by her resident doctor in the UND Family Medicine Residency to receive a glider rocking chair courtesy of the residency's Rocking Chair Project.

The Rocking Chair Project is sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation. It gives grants to different family residency programs across the United States so residents can provide selected mothers with rocking chairs.

Lisa Schirrick, RN nurse coordinator at the residency, heard about the project and took the necessary steps to get involved. UND was awarded a grant for six rocking chairs, one for each second-year resident in the residency program.

"They each have their own patients and are able to choose which mother they feel should have the rocking chair," said Schirrick. "There is always one family who will step out in your mind."

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Didn't have one

Lindquist found out she would be receiving a chair when she was four or five months pregnant.

"I didn't have a rocking chair yet, so this was great."

When the baby is born, the chair is shipped to the family, and then, the resident doctor actually goes to the family's home to help put the chair together, providing another chance for the doctors to see a different side of their patients.

"It is amazing how much it affects the residents," said Dr. Greg Greek, program director for the Family Medicine Residency. "They get to see their patient in the homes and interact with the babies in whole new ways."

As for Lindquist, the experience with the assembly of the chair was good. Interesting, but good.

"It was the first time the chair had been put together so the first attempt at it, some things got mixed up," said Lindquist. "Eventually, it all got put together right. It just took a few tries."

Not a good sleeper

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After the chair is assembled, both mother and doctor fill out questionnaires about their experiences with the Rocking Chair Project. Right now, Lindquist can only sing praises about the chair.

"It is awesome, since he is not a good sleeper, yet," said Lindquist. "We use it every night whenever he wakes up."

The answers are positive from the residents' point of view as well. Dr. Greek recalled one specific answer on the questionnaire that stuck with him.

"A spark ignited a new light inside of me," wrote one resident. "And now, I really appreciate what wonderful patients I have."

A rocking chair to help new mothers put children to sleep is only one aspect of the project. According to Schirrick, it extends much further than that.

"The patients trust us with the most delicate things in their lives," said Schirrick. "It makes them aware that we are going to be there for them beyond delivery day."

Reach Rude at (701) 787-6754, (800) 477-6572, ext. 754; or arude@gfherald.com .

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