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Remembering JFK: Herald seeks reader submissions

The nation will pause and reflect on Nov. 22, the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. It is one of those tragic moments -- such as the Dec. 7, 1941, bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion o...

President John F. Kennedy the day he was assassinated

The nation will pause and reflect on Nov. 22, the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

It is one of those tragic moments -- such as the Dec. 7, 1941, bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion or 9/11 -- that will never leave us.

Most Americans who were alive on Nov. 22, 1963, remember exactly where they were and what they were doing when they heard the news. For many, that event had a major impact on their lives.

Perhaps you responded to JFK's challenge: "Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country." Thousands of Americans joined the Peace Corps, which JFK initiated. Others responded by pursuing public service careers.

Where were you, and what impact did JFK's assassination have on your life? We at the Herald would like to hear or read your stories for a special project we're planning for the 50th anniversary observance of JFK's death.

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Please write us a note. Tell us your story. And please include your name and information on how to contact you. Contact the Herald by sending an email to news@gfherald.com with the subject line JFK 50, or send your handwritten note to The Herald, Attn: JFK 50, P.O. Box 6008, Grand Forks, N.D., 58206-6008.

The deadline for submissions is Nov. 13.

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