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Release denied for woman accused of driving over her boyfriend; psychiatric evaluation ordered

MITCHELL, S.D. - A woman charged with attempted murder for allegedly driving over her boyfriend was denied release from custody and will receive a psychiatric evaluation.

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MITCHELL, S.D. - A woman charged with attempted murder for allegedly driving over her boyfriend was denied release from custody and will receive a psychiatric evaluation.

Roberta Woodside, 38, of Mitchell, S.D., was present during a circuit court session Tuesday at the Davison County Public Safety Center in Mitchell and was denied several motions, including motions for bond reduction and release from custody on a furlough.

Woodside pleaded not guilty on March 8 to first-degree attempted murder, a class 2 felony, aggravated assault causing bodily injury with indifference to human life, a class 3 felony, as well as two alternative counts of aggravated assault causing serious bodily injury, class 3 felonies.

The charges stem from a Feb. 24 incident in which Woodside struck her boyfriend, Joseph Vasquez, twice with a vehicle near the Davison County Jail, according to court documents.

Vasquez appeared in court Tuesday for another matter and said he recently had a metal bar placed in his leg and could walk normally, but he cannot place as much weight on the leg as before.

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Doug Dailey, Woodside’s attorney, said a furlough or bond reduction would allow Woodside to visit her juvenile child because the Department of Social Services does not like to schedule visits in the jail, as meeting there is not in the child’s best interest.

Davison County State’s Attorney Jim Miskimins said DSS prefers to schedule meetings in locations that are the “least restrictive” between a parent and child but would make arrangements within the rules of the Davison County Sheriff’s Office.

Miskimins also cited drugs as a concern regarding Woodside’s release from jail, as she was also indicted on Dec. 4 for ingestion of methamphetamine, a class 5 felony, between Sept. 11 and 13 and is charged with dispensing a schedule III or IV drug, a class 5 felony, for allegedly giving Tramadol to an inmate on May 8 while she was being held in the Davison County Jail.

“We believe she is a danger to herself and others due to her continuing alleged drug addiction, and if she was released, that would present a potential danger not only to herself but to other people,” Miskimins said.

Judge Tim Bjorkman denied the requests for bond reduction and release on furlough, adding that Woodside failed to appear for a court hearing in the past and may leave the county.

“It's my view that Ms. Woodside does pose a risk of flight,” Bjorkman said. “While I am approving a psychological evaluation, a psychiatric evaluation, I don't find that bond modification is warranted.”

Bjorkman approved the payment of travel expenses for an Avera Medical Group doctor to travel to Mitchell to complete the psychiatric evaluation instead of transporting Woodside to Minnehaha County.

The court also granted a motion for a private investigator - capped at $3,000 - and a motion for disclosure of prior “bad acts” evidence.

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Related Topics: CRIME
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