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Regional Roundup: Crookston looks to expand landfill

Crookston looks to expand landfill Polk County is proposing to expand its existing Gentilly (Minn.) Solid Waste Landfill, located 8 miles east of Crookston. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency is seeking public comments as part of its environm...

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Crookston looks to expand landfill

Polk County is proposing to expand its existing Gentilly (Minn.) Solid Waste Landfill, located 8 miles east of Crookston.

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency is seeking public comments as part of its environmental assessment, according to a report from KROX Radio. Comments are being taken through April 6.

Currently, the landfill covers about 52 acres. The expansion would increase it by about 13 acres. A proposed sand and gravel operation operation would cover another 115 acres of the 360-acre plot of land near Gentilly, Minn.

The Environmental Assessment Worksheet covers site location details, nearby resources and other elements such as water use, wetlands, manure management, air, odor emissions and traffic. Comments may be submitted to kevin.kain@state.mn.us .

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Fertile to get natural gas service

"It's going to happen."

That's how Brian Nephew, mayor of Fertile, Minn., responded to a recent question about whether the community will receive natural gas service.

A public meeting will be held at 7 p.m. March 21 in the Duane Knutson Community Center, according to a report in the Fertile Journal.

The natural gas line had been installed between Twin Valley and Mahnomen last summer.

Officials from Community Co-op of Lake Park, which installed the line, said it could be extended to Fertile at no additional cost to the city and will not require a tax increase.

Residents will be able to choose whether or not to hook up to the line.

Construction is expected to start in April, with completion by the fall.

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Music still playing in Lancaster

When Alanna Dawson, the only music teacher at Lancaster (Minn.) School, was forced to quit her job last month after the Canadian citizen's work permit expired, local officials worried that the school might lose its music program.

"It was a sad day in the building for the kids and for the faculty," Superintendent Steve Swiontek said after her last day, Feb. 12, according to a report in the North Star News.

However, the school's music program is continuing. Cindy Christopherson stepped in as a substitute for a couple of weeks. Now, another substitute will be on board until May. Misty Koop is an East Grand Forks native and Grand Forks Red River High School graduate who has a master's degree in music from UND.

Dawson could return next school year. School officials have applied for a three-year work visa for the Canadian. If that doesn't work out, the school plans to advertise for a new teacher.

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