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Regional Roundup

Hillsboro considers building lot incentives Hillsboro, N.D., is considering money-back incentives in an effort to spark the sale of residential building lots in one of its subdivisions. City Commission President Mark Forseth has proposed the "Hil...

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Hillsboro considers building lot incentives

Hillsboro, N.D., is considering money-back incentives in an effort to spark the sale of residential building lots in one of its subdivisions.

City Commission President Mark Forseth has proposed the "Hillsboro $1,500 Lot Program" in the city's Prairieview Addition, according to a report in the Hillsboro Banner.

About 20 undeveloped lots remain in the 32-lot subdivision, with lot prices at $10,000 to $12,500. Under the proposal, people who purchase lots, build and occupy a house in the subdivision by Feb. 17 would be refunded all but $1,500 of the lot price.

The city would retain the $1,500 to cover legal fees.

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Lancaster School to buy xylophones

It sounds as though students at Lancaster (Minn.) School will be striking some new keys in music class.

The school district will receive an "Arts Project Grant: Art Equipment for Schools" grant for $2,790, according to a report in the North Star News. The grant money is to be used to "purchase artistic equipment for their visual art, performing art, media arts or creative writing departments.

The school district plans to spend the money to purchase 12 xylophones of various sizes.

The musical instruments mainly will be used in elementary classes, though other students are expected to have access to them. The report indicated they may be used by the high school band, as well.

Warroad city park taking shape

It might be the dead of winter, but people in Warroad, Minn., are planning for a big summer project at the new city park, according to a report in the Warroad Pioneer.

Plans for this year's phase 2 include design and construction of an enclosed pavilion and amphitheater at the park, located at the site of the old Warroad Care Center.

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Already completed in phase 1 of the project are a gazebo, sledding hill, two picnic shelters and restrooms, plus walking paths, parking areas and some landscaping.

Phase 3, set for 2017, will include construction of horseshoe pits, walking paths, rollerblading paths and more.

The park is expected to be completed in 2018.

Park River looking to attract hotel

A hotel developer is looking at Park River, N.D., as a potential site for a facility.

Officials from Cobblestones Hotels is talking with Park River officials about the proposal. A public meeting was held last week, according to a report in the Walsh County Press.

Cobblestone Hotels are located in 10 North Dakota medium-sized cities, with Langdon, N.D., and Devils Lake being the closest.

The company's smallest properties are 31-room "inns and suites" without swimming pools, or 36-room "hotels and suites" with pools, according to the report.

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The company also has been considering Hillsboro, N.D., for another hotel.

Besides Devils Lake and Langdon, Cobblestone also is located in Beulah, Bottineau, Carrington, Harvey, Killdeer, Linton, Rugby and Steele.

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