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Red River at Fargo flows at highest recorded November level

FARGO The Red River in Fargo is flowing at the highest level ever recorded for the month of November, the U.S. Geological Survey says. The Red was flowing at 8,040 cubic feet per second Wednesday, making it the highest stream flow recorded for th...

FARGO

The Red River in Fargo is flowing at the highest level ever recorded for the month of November, the U.S. Geological Survey says.

The Red was flowing at 8,040 cubic feet per second Wednesday, making it the highest stream flow recorded for the month of November since measurements were started in 1901.

"It is concerning to see this level of stream flow in November," said Gregg Wiche, who directs the USGS North Dakota Water Science Center.

The flow in the Red River at Fargo peaked last fall at 9,180 cubic feet per second on Oct. 16. By Wednesday, it had fallen to 1,400 cubic feet per second, the USGS said.

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The Red crested at 23.59 feet Wednesday, about 5½ feet above flood stage and a record for this time of year, the USGS said.

The river was at 22.81 feet as of 7 p.m. Thursday, the National Weather Service reported.

It is expected to drop to its flood stage of 18 feet late Sunday night or early Monday, the NWS predicts.

The Red went over flood stage in the metro last weekend as runoff from October's rain and snowmelt surged into tributaries and toward

The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead and the Herald are Forum Communications Co. newspapers.

Related Topics: 2009 FLOODCASS COUNTYMOORHEADRED RIVER
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