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Red Lake man pleads guilty to sexual abuse, failing to register as a sex offender

A Red Lake, Minn., man pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to sexually abusing a woman who couldn't defend herself, the U.S. attorney's office said in a news release.

A Red Lake, Minn., man pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to sexually abusing a woman who couldn't defend herself, the U.S. attorney's office said in a news release.

Jeremy Wind, 27, admitted he entered the victim's bedroom May 22, 2009, and had sex with her, "knowing she was incapable of declining participation or communicating unwillingness to engage in the sexual act," the release states. Wind also admitted he did not properly register as a sex offender from October 2008 to May 2009, the release says.

He had been registering as a sex offender since 2000, but in 2008, he did not give authorities his new address on the Red Lake Indian Reservation, the release says.

Wind, a Level II offender, has two previous convictions of fifth-degree criminal sexual conduct from 2000 and 2006.

He faces a potential maximum penalty of life in prison on the charge of sexual abuse and 10 years in prison for failure to register as a sex offender.

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His sentencing has not been scheduled.

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