Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Plea agreement reached, GF man sentenced in marijuana cookie case

A Grand Forks man, whose 9-year-old son found a marijuana-laced cookie in his kitchen and ate it, was sentenced Tuesday in state District Court in Grand Forks.

A Grand Forks man, whose 9-year-old son found a marijuana-laced cookie in his kitchen and ate it, was sentenced Tuesday in state District Court in Grand Forks.

Nathan Bazey, 26, reached a plea agreement to reduce the charge from a Class C felony of child neglect to a misdemeanor for reckless endangerment.

Judge Sonja Clapp sentenced Bazey to 90 days in the Grand Forks County Corrections Center with all but eight suspended. Bazey received credit for one day and will serve the other seven over the next two weekends. He was also placed on two years of unsupervised probatin.

Court documents said Bazey told an investigator he knew the cookie was in the cupboard but didn't learn the child had eaten it until later. Assistant States Attorney Chris Griffin told the court the state received a letter from the child's mother saying she never wanted criminal charges to be filed. Griffin said the state didn't find intent on Bazey's part.

The incident occurred in November and a report from social services prompted a police investigation.

What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.