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Peregrine banding event set for 2 p.m. Thursday below UND water tower

As part of the event, climbers will ascend the tower to retrieve the peregrine nestlings from the nest box and lower the birds to the ground. At that point, Driscoll and an assistant will take a few measurements, band the chicks and name them.

072419.N.GFH.PEREGRINEBAND-2018 banding.jpg
A peregrine falcon chick peers out of a bowl in June 2018 as raptor expert Tim Driscoll and Erika Kolbow of Turtle River State Park prepare to band the bird near the UND water tower. A similar public banding event is set for 2 p.m. Thursday, June 10, in the same location. (File photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald)

A public banding event to band the peregrine falcon chicks hatched this year atop the UND water tower is set for 2 p.m. Thursday, June 10, below the water tower.

The public is welcome to attend the banding event, Tim Driscoll of the Urban Raptor Research Project, said in a posting to the Grand Cities Bird Club. A licensed bander, Driscoll has overseen the peregrine recovery work in Grand Forks since the falcons first began nesting locally in 2008.

  • Always in Season/ Mike Jacobs: First peregrine of the season shows up in Grand Forks Peregrines are cliff nesters, and the water tower on the UND campus makes a suitable substitute.
  • Center near Winnipeg provides a place for peregrines NEAR WINNIPEG--David, a peregrine falcon hatched in 2016 atop the UND water tower, was about a year and a half old when he was found grounded with a wing injury last September along the Red River in Winnipeg.
  • Marilyn Hagerty namesake peregrine produces two chicks in Manitoba From the "wow, that's cool" department comes this news about a peregrine falcon hatched in 2016 atop the UND water tower and named after longtime Herald columnist Marilyn Hagerty.

As part of the event, climbers will ascend the tower to retrieve the peregrine nestlings from the nest box and lower the birds to the ground. At that point, Driscoll and an assistant will take a few measurements, band the chicks and name them. The climbers then will return the nestlings to the nest box on the water tower.
The nestlings are offspring of Marv, a male who has been breeding in Grand Forks since 2014, and an unbanded female. Banded in 2013 as a nestling in Fargo, Marv is named after Marv Bossart, a Fargo TV personality who died earlier that year.

Anyone who is not vaccinated is asked to wear a mask to Thursday's banding event, Driscoll said. The best place to park for anyone not affiliated with UND is the parking ramp near the intersection of University Avenue and Columbia Road.

For more information, contact Driscoll at (701) 772-1222.

Brad Dokken joined the Herald company in November 1985 as a copy editor for Agweek magazine and has been the Grand Forks Herald's outdoors editor since 1998.

Besides his role as an outdoors writer, Dokken has an extensive background in northwest Minnesota and Canadian border issues and provides occasional coverage on those topics.

Reach him at bdokken@gfherald.com, by phone at (701) 780-1148 or on Twitter at @gfhoutdoor.
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