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Pedestrian barrier project withdrawn from Grand Forks City Council consideration

The decision to construct a $23,000 fence on North Columbia Road in Grand Forks has been put off indefinitely. The city and UND would have split costs evenly on the fence, which would run parallel to Columbia Road starting near Second Avenue Sout...

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The decision to construct a $23,000 fence on North Columbia Road in Grand Forks has been put off indefinitely.

The city and UND would have split costs evenly on the fence, which would run parallel to Columbia Road starting near Second Avenue South and connecting with Columbia's overpass wall.

The wall, approximately 6 feet tall if built, aimed to prevent pedestrians from crossing the road from a parking lot near Memorial Stadium on the east side of Columbia and proceeding west to the Hyslop Sports Center on campus.

The City Council's Service and Safety Committee was informed that the project had been withdrawn from its Tuesday night agenda.

Instead, the project will continue to be examined by a joint city and UND transportation committee, Community/Government Relation Officer Pete Haga said in an email to the committee.

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The transportation committee will decide if the project should be brought before the city again.

The fence and its perceived need drew criticism from some council members at the safety committee's last meeting, Sept. 10.

Traffic and accident data on the area were requested by council member Tyrone Grandstrand, who said he thought the fence's construction could create more problems than it would fix.

No data were offered at the meeting prior to the project's withdrawal.

Call Jewett at (701) 780-1108; (800) 477-6572, ext. 1108; or send email to bjewett@gfherald.com . Follow her on Twitter at @gfcitybeat or on her blog at citystreetbeat.areavoice.com.

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