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Park River man to serve more than seven years in prison for child porn

GRAFTON, N.D.--A Park River, N.D., man accused of having hundreds of child pornography images has been ordered to serve more than seven years in prison.

GRAFTON, N.D.-A Park River, N.D., man accused of having hundreds of child pornography images has been ordered to serve more than seven years in prison.

Judge Laurie Fontaine handed down the sentence Thursday in Walsh County District Court to Steven Dale Dishner, 42, after he pleaded guilty in November to 100 counts of possessing certain materials prohibited, all Class C felonies. He initially was charged with 486 counts, but the remaining charges will be dismissed.

Investigators found "between 100 and 1,000 images of children in both sexual acts and nude poses" on an external hard drive found at Dishner's home in Park River, according to court documents filed April 21.

Dishner was ordered to serve five years on the first count and was credited 328 days for time served. He was sentenced to an additional five years on the second count with two years suspended for three years if he fulfills the terms of his probation.

Two consecutive five-year sentences were added for the remaining counts, but those also were suspended for three years.

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Each Class C felony carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

Dishner must register as a sex offender for at least 15 years, according to the judgement.

Related Topics: GRAFTON
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