Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Oil spill contaminating Yellowstone River makes daily life difficult for nearby residents

GLENDIVE, Mont. -- When Ginger Mosley first detected the smell of oil in the water at her home on Dodge Street in Glendive, it didn't take long for her 15-year-old son Tyler to fill up a glass, slosh it around and take a swig. "He said, 'It taste...

1475590+012215.N.BG_.Spill_.jpg
Free bottled water for Glendive residents fills the EPEC Center after a Bridger Pipeline spilled oil under the Yellowstone River near Glendive on Saturday. January 21, 2015.

 

GLENDIVE, Mont. -- When Ginger Mosley first detected the smell of oil in the water at her home on Dodge Street in Glendive, it didn’t take long for her 15-year-old son Tyler to fill up a glass, slosh it around and take a swig.

“He said, 'It tastes like WD-40,'” Mosley said. “My son, he will experiment with anything.”

Not having water has made daily life difficult for Mosley and her family, she said. “Everybody says its safe to take a bath or a shower or do your dishes. No, not me.”

She’s been showering and taking gallon jugs home from her niece Robin Poeverlein-Heinrich’s house in West Glendive, which is gets its water from a well.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We have a reverse osmosis system, so we can drink from our well,” Poeverlein-Heinrich said.

Poeverlein-Heinrich has had a steady stream of relatives coming through to take showers, since an oil spill from a pipeline on Saturday contaminated the Yellowstone River and the Glendive municipal water supply.

Mosley has two gallon jugs, and she’s been delivering additional jugs to less-mobile family members.

Poeverlein-Heinrich was also hauling water to a group home for developmentally disabled adults where she is a habilitation technician until truckloads of bottled water began to arrive at the Eastern Plains Event Center on Tuesday.

By Wednesday, the effort to get water to Glendive residents was in full swing, and the center was bustling as people signed in to get some of the more than 16,000 bottles of water.

The response from the community has been overwhelming, said Jenn Fladager, the Dawson County Health Department public health emergency preparedness coordinator.

Fladager has been in charge of the EPEC’s water distribution, and there’s been more people offering to volunteer than they had jobs for, she said. “We’ve had so many we’ve had to turn some away.”

Charrie Eauber, came down to the EPEC with her husband, Randy, to get some gallon jugs of water, and said not being able to drink their water has been hard, but it’s shown how the community can pull together.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Its been run real smooth,” she said. “Everyone has been trying to help out everyone else.”

What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.