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October in Grand Forks was seventh-coldest, eighth-wettest on record

It was a top 10 sort of month all around, as October came in as the seventh-coldest and eighth-wettest on record in Grand Forks, according to data reported by John Hoppes, a forecaster with the National Weather Service office.

It was a top 10 sort of month all around, as October came in as the seventh-coldest and eighth-wettest on record in Grand Forks, according to data reported by John Hoppes, a forecaster with the National Weather Service office.

The average temperature last month was 39.9 degrees, with an average daily high of 46.8 degrees and an average daily low of 33 degrees. The coldest October on record at Grand Forks Mark Andrews International Airport was in 2002, when the average daily temperature was 34.3 degrees.

A total of 2.61 inches of rain fell, 0.94 of an inch above the long-term norm but well below the record of 5 inches in October 1982. Last year, 4.2 inches fell in October during the wettest fall on record in Grand Forks.

Some daily records were set last month: 1.17 inches of rain Oct. 1 beat the old record for the date of 0.60 of an inch set in 1983; 0.60 of an inch of snow fell Oct. 14, easily besting the previous record for the date of a trace in 1975; on Oct. 20, the 0.30 of an inch of rainfall was a record for the date, beating the 1984 record of 0.28 of an inch.

Reach Lee at (701) 780-1237; (800) 477-6572, ext. 237; or send e-mail to slee@gfherald.com .

Related Topics: WEATHER
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