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Northwest Minn. mom charged with kidnapping her own children reaches plea agreement

AUSTIN, Minn. -- A Moorhead mom charged in October with allegedly kidnapping her own kids reached a plea deal with prosecutors this week. On Monday, Nov. 26, 39-year-old Izetta Cooley pleaded guilty to one felony count of violating custody protec...

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Izetta Cooley

AUSTIN, Minn. - A Moorhead mom charged in October with allegedly kidnapping her own kids reached a plea deal with prosecutors this week.

On Monday, Nov. 26, 39-year-old Izetta Cooley pleaded guilty to one felony count of violating custody protection orders, according to court records.

Kristen Nelsen, Mower County attorney, said two felony charges of kidnapping against Cooley were dismissed by the judge at Monday's hearing due to a "lack of probable cause."

A fourth charge of violating custody protection orders will be dismissed as part of the plea agreement at Cooley's sentencing in March 2019, Nelsen said.

Five of Cooley's children went missing Saturday, Sept. 29, when she allegedly took two of her children from a foster home in Rose Creek, Minn., despite a court order prohibiting her from having contact with them.

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Four of her children were found Oct. 2, at the family's home in Moorhead, and the last child turned himself in to the police on Oct. 4.

Cooley's husband, Miguel Cooley, was charged with a Class AA felony count of murder in connection with the death of 20-year-old Gabriel Perez outside a McDonald's restaurant in Fargo in September.

At a hearing Wednesday, Nov. 28, in Cass County District Court, Miguel Cooley's attorney requested more time to review evidence in the case.

Cass County District Judge John Irby granted the request and a preliminary hearing date has yet to be set.

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