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North Dakota woman dies in train-car collision near Page

A 67-year-old Cooperstown, N.D., woman died Sunday evening when the car she was driving was struck by a train near Page, N.D., according to the North Dakota Highway Patrol.

A 67-year-old Cooperstown, N.D., woman died Sunday evening when the car she was driving was struck by a train near Page, N.D., according to the North Dakota Highway Patrol.

The crash happened at 6:35 p.m. 1 mile southeast of Page on a rural gravel township road.

The patrol said Judy Rahlf was eastbound on the road when she attempted to cross railroad tracks, traveling about 15 mph, and was struck by a southeast-bound BNSF train that was pulling 73 cars at 52 mph. The train's horn and emergency brakes were activated before the crash, the patrol said. The train was unable to stop and struck the left side of the car. The train and car slid for about a third of a mile before coming to rest on the tracks.

Rahlf was airlifted to Sanford Medical Center in Fargo, where she died, the patrol said.

Rahlf was wearing a seat belt at the time of the crash. The 1999 Chrysler Concorde that Rahlf was driving had extensive damage, the patrol said.

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The crash is under investigation.

Other agencies assisting were Cass County Sheriff's Office, Page Ambulance, Page Fire Department, Buffalo Rescue and Sanford Life Flight.

Related Topics: CRASHES
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