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North Dakota Guard soldiers returning tonight

North Dakota National Guard soldiers who have spent the past year in Afghanistan will return to Grand Forks tonight. About 40 soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 188th Air Defense Artillery Regiment's RAID III (Rapid Aerostat Initial Deployment miss...

North Dakota National Guard soldiers who have spent the past year in Afghanistan will return to Grand Forks tonight.

About 40 soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 188th Air Defense Artillery Regiment's RAID III (Rapid Aerostat Initial Deployment mission, based in Grand Forks, were scheduled to leave by bus today from Fort McCoy Army Base near LaCrosse, Wis.

Buses are expected to arrive in North Dakota tonight, making stops in Fargo, Grand Forks and Bismarck. Here is the approximate arrival schedule:

n 9 p.m. -- Fargo Armed Forces Reserve Center.

n 10:30 p.m. -- Grand Forks Armory Complex, 1501 48th St. South.

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n Midnight -- Raymond J. Bohn Armory, Bismarck.

About 40 Soldiers comprise RAID III, which arrived in Fort McCoy, Wis., Tuesday to demobilize.

The National Guard is inviting the public to join with family members and friends to welcome these Soldiers home. Updates in bus arrival times will be posted via Twitter Thursday evening at www.twitter.com/NDNationalGuard .

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