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No foul play suspected in death of man near railroad tracks in Alexandria, Minnesota

Although authorities are still awaiting official medical findings, they believe a man who was found on Dec. 5 leaning against a tree by the railroad tracks in Alexandria died of natural causes.

Although authorities are still awaiting official medical findings, they believe a man who was found on Dec. 5 leaning against a tree by the railroad tracks in Alexandria died of natural causes.

The man has been identified as Robert E. Lee, 70, of Gay Mills, Wisconsin.

His body was discovered by several people walking along the railroad tracks on the 900 block of Nokomis Street. Police responded to the area and found the man, who was deceased.

He appeared to be seated on the ground and leaning with his back against a tree, mostly covered in snow.

According to APD, the initial investigation on scene did not show any obvious signs of trauma or observable injury to the body. Officials also noted that it appeared the deceased had been there prior to the first significant snowfall of the season.

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The body was transported to the Midwest Medical Examiner's Office for autopsy where preliminary findings indicated there was no noticeable trauma or significant injury to the male victim.

Last week, Police Chief Rick Wyffels said that the investigation has not found any signs of foul play.

The case remains under investigation pending a full medical examiner's report and findings.

Al Edenloff is the editor of the twice-weekly Echo Press. He started his journalism career when he was in 10th grade, writing football and basketball stories for the Parkers Prairie Independent.
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