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New book features historic forts

Herald Staff Report They once hosted presidents, foreign dignitaries and some of the most famous names of the Old West. They were among the first to receive word of the disaster at Little Bighorn and saw the surrender and deaths of Sitting Bull a...

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Herald Staff Report

They once hosted presidents, foreign dignitaries and some of the most famous names of the Old West. They were among the first to receive word of the disaster at Little Bighorn and saw the surrender and deaths of Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse.

And day to day, the forts of the Northern Plains meant protection and supplies to the travelers, settlers, workers and soldiers of the region.

In his new book, "Forts of the Northern Plains: Guide to Historic Military Posts of the Plains Indian Wars," writer Jeff Barnes, Omaha, Neb., visited more than 50 of the outposts of the American frontier, including ones in North Dakota and Minnesota.

Some sites continue as military forts more than 100 years since the end of the wars, Barnes said in a news release, and some continue as state and national parks. But many more have disappeared or are disappearing.

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Barnes drove more than 13,000 miles to write about and photograph sites for his guide published by Stackpole Books. Sen. Ben Nelson, D-Neb., wrote the foreword of the book and the cover features Fort Abercrombie in North Dakota.

"Forts of the Northern Plains" is a guide to military posts including Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota and the eastern portions of Montana and Wyoming. In addition to a brief history and present status of each fort, the book includes historical and present-day images and photographs along with information on related reading, attractions and contacts for the sites.

The book includes these North Dakota sites: Fort Abercromie, Fort Abraham Lincoln, Fort Buford, Fort Ransom, Fort Rice, Fort Seward, Fort Stevenson, Fort Totten, Fort Union and Fort Yates.

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