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Nearly $2.9 million in Head Start funds awarded to tribe

Nearly $2.9 million in Head Start funding was awarded Monday to the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation, according to the offices of Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Rep. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D.

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Nearly $2.9 million in Head Start funding was awarded Monday to the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation, according to the offices of Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Rep. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D.

The federal funding will support Early Head Start and Head Start programs as the tribe works to improve its governance, children's health and safety and provide comprehensive early education services to improve school readiness for American Indian children, according to a news release. The funds will support the programs over the course of five years.

"These funds show a commitment to Native American children, but there is still much we need to do," Heitkamp said.

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