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NDUS summit to focus on concept of outrage

Outrage can be exhilarating, but is it productive? An arts and humanities summit at UND on Thursday will bring together academics from across the state's higher education landscape to examine the concept of outrage now and through the ages -- to ...

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Outrage can be exhilarating, but is it productive?

An arts and humanities summit at UND on Thursday will bring together academics from across the state's higher education landscape to examine the concept of outrage now and through the ages - to probe at the heart of how heated dialogue can be a force for change.

Summit co-organizer Bill Caraher, a UND associate professor of history, said the event's primary purpose is a "restarting" of a North Dakota University System tradition of holding such summits to allow faculty members from different public institutions to gather, mingle and explore a central theme as academics.

The more specific purpose of the event, Caraher said, is rooted in contemporary examples of highly charged expression.

"As humanists, as people who are interested in the way in which people function in our world, we should interrogate this critically," he said. "We need to look to see if people are doing outrage the best they can do outrage-to see if we can engage this mode of discourse and conversation."

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The daylong schedule of events includes discussions of outrage through history, as well as local examples of outraged communication, such as that surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline and the cancellation of the UND music therapy program. The summit will run from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

A full schedule for the day can be found here.

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