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N.D. Supreme Court refuses to rehear medication abortion law

BISMARCK - The North Dakota Supreme Court has declined to rehear arguments against their ruling that upheld a state law passed in 2011 that limits drug-induced abortions.

BISMARCK – The North Dakota Supreme Court has declined to rehear arguments against their ruling that upheld a state law passed in 2011 that limits drug-induced abortions.

The state’s only abortion clinic petitioned the high court for a rehearing in November to clarify what it called ambiguities in the effects of House Bill 1297.

The bill makes it illegal for doctors to provide medication abortions unless they have a contract with another doctor who has admitting privileges at an area hospital.

The state’s high court upholding the bill’s constitutionality reversed a lower court decision that found it was essentially a ban on drug-induced abortions.

The clinic has ceased providing women with drug-induced abortions since the state Supreme Court’s original ruling in October.

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