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N.D. Supreme Court Justice, UND law school graduate to step down

BISMARCK -- North Dakota Supreme Court Justice Mary Muehlen Maring will step down from her position December 31. Maring submitted her letter of resignation Tuesday to Gov. Jack Dalrymple. She served 17 1/2 years after she was appointed by former Gov.

North Dakota Supreme Court Justice Mary Muehlen Maring

BISMARCK -- North Dakota Supreme Court Justice Mary Muehlen Maring will step down from her position December 31.

Maring submitted her letter of resignation Tuesday to Gov. Jack Dalrymple.

She served 17 ½ years after she was appointed by former Gov. Ed Schafer in 1996 to fill the vacancy created by Justice Beryl Levine's retirement.

North Dakota voters elected Maring in 1996 to carry out the remaining term. Maring was re-elected in 1998 and 2008.

"During my time on the court, I have gained enormous respect for the judges who serve our trial courts and the Supreme Court and all the court personnel. They all work very hard to assure that our system of justice protects and serves the citizens of North Dakota," Maring said in her resignation letter. "I have also developed great admiration for our Executive and Legislative branches and the effective manner in which they govern our state."

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Maring is a 1975 graduate of the University of North Dakota School of Law and practiced law privately for 20 years before her appointment.

Dalrymple will look to appoint a new judge to fill the vacancy. The person appointed to the judgeship would serve until the 2016 general election. The person elected in 2016 would serve the remainder of Maring's term through Dec. 31, 2018.

Supreme Court justices serve 10-year terms.

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