Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Most of NDSU's Minard Hall reopens Monday

FARGO -- Two-thirds of Minard Hall at North Dakota State University reopened Monday as crews continue working to stabilize the roof of the area that collapsed.

Minard Hall
Dirt is pushed into place on Monday to stabilize the north wall of Minard Hall on the campus of North Dakota State University. Photo by David Samson/The Forum.

FARGO -- Two-thirds of Minard Hall at North Dakota State University reopened Monday as crews continue working to stabilize the roof of the area that collapsed.

Steel beams are being used to shore up the roofline, and the work is expected to continue until Thursday, said Bruce Frantz, facilities management director.

Next, columns will be added so the floors can be jacked up. That process may take two to three weeks, Frantz said.

Crews aim to do most of the disruptive work before classes resume next week, Frantz said.

The northwest wall of Minard collapsed early Dec. 27. A cause for the incident is still being determined.

ADVERTISEMENT

Areas of Minard Hall are open normal business hours.

After the roofline is stabilized, NDSU will seek approval from city of Fargo building officials to reopen the northeast corner of Minard.

Dalrymple is a reporter at The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, which is owned by Forum Communications Co.

What To Read Next
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.
2022 saw more than three times as many pediatric (up to age 5) cannabis edible exposures in Minnesota compared to 2021. Here's what you can do to prevent your toddler from getting into the gummies.